Classic Car Restoration – What You Need To Know

By contrast, traditional carnauba waxes and paint sealants do not offer any resistance to scratches and scuffs due to the very thin layer of paint protection they offer. There are a lot of steps involved in getting your classic car restored, and it’s best that you know at least a little about them so you don’t get ripped off, now I’m by no means saying that most shops out there are going to rip you off, but there are a select few shops that make a living pulling little tricks, short cuts and work a rounds, and you don’t want them doing this on your car.

Now first and foremost a restoration shop is not like your local collision repair shop, it’s completely different in every respect, yes a restoration shop does body and paint work, but that is about where the similarities end, a collision repair shop can look at the damage to your car from a collision and give you an estimate with in $100 dollars of the job.

A restoration shop cannot begin to give you an estimate that is even in the ball park, there is no way for them to see every last detail of the restoration on your car, every car is different, some cars are rusted out more then others, parts car be almost impossible to locate for some cars, you don’t just call the local parts store for some of these parts, especially when your talking MOPAR restoration work, there just weren’t a lot of them built in the first place.

Now a shop could tell you something like this when you ask for an estimate, a normal restoration on a car that’s in good shape, with no, or very little rust would take about 800 hours for us to restore, and this would probably be about right, and if the car is in bad shape you could add about 300 hours, this would be pretty close to what it should be, but every shop is a little different, and you have got to know that these estimates are based on time only, parts are added cost, and usually added time.

When a shop tries to give you an estimate, it usually ends up with the car not getting completed, and the owner of the shop, and his customer being very unhappy with each other, and this doesn’t need to happen, this is one reason that my shop doesn’t give estimates on work, unless it’s just something like changing a quarter panel, or door, something simple, on a full restoration we can’t do it, we have tried, and we have had the same problems that I have alluded to earlier.

OK; now that I have finished that little tangent, let’s get down to business, the very first thing is that you love your car, because you’ll be spending a lot of time with it, rather you do the work yourself, or hire a shop to do it for you, either way it will take a lot of time to finish the restoration work, the word restoration itself should be enough to tell you that, most shop are just a man living his dream to restore cars for a living.

Now if you choose to have a shop do the work on your car, make sure that you take a tour of any shop that you are considering to let do the work, during this tour you should look around the shop, look that how clean the shop is, look ate the quality of the equipment and tools that the shop is using, high quality tools and equipment indicate pride in their shop, and in their workmanship, and clean shop shows pride in the shop, and gives you an idea of how they’ll treat your car.

Now look at the work in the shop, look at the other cars, ask the employees what their doing, and why they’re doing it, one of the best answers that you could hear is, I love classic cars, and I think of each car that I restore as my own, if this were my car, how would I want it done, and then I do it that way, or as close as possible with in the budget that we have to work with.

If you decide that you want the work done faster, the shop will put more people on you project, but you have got to realize that these people are working for the shop labor rate, so if the shop has a labor rate of $75.00 per hour, and you have two people working on your car, your not paying $75.00 your paying $125.00 per hour, or shop rate for each employee that’s working on your car, and it is fair, they had to leave another job to help on your car, and their job is now just sitting there waiting for him to get back to it.

As you’ve seen I talk a lot about the shop, and the work they do, and what they charger for their work, now I’ll give you a few questions that you should ask the owner of the shop while he’s by you, or you can ask the foreman of the shop id the owner is gone.

1. Has your shop ever restored one of these kind of car in the past.

2.If so, can I see some before, after, and during pictures.

3.Ask them why they should be the shop that restores your car.

4.If your doing to take to the shows, have they won any awards from car shows.

5.Tell them what your going to do with the car, I.E. It’s a driver, it’s a show car.

6.Do you have a good parts connection for the parts on my car.

7.Do you charge to locate parts for my car.

8.What is you typical time frame for completion of the restoration work.

9.If you want custom paint, does their shop do it, or is it farmed out.

10.Do you have references from past customers, a lot of shops don’t, and it doesn’t mean anything, but if they do, please ask to take a look at them.

If you just do a little research, you can save yourself a lot of agony, and the shop also, before you go in to the shop get all of your ducks in a row, learn about your car, make sure that the shop has worked on your make and model of car, most shops have pictures of cars that they have restored, sit down and look at what they have, ask a lot of questions, most shops expect that, if they don’t like you asking questions, look for a different shop to do the work on your car.

Make 100% sure that all of your questions are answered to your satisfaction, if you don’t ask any questions then it’s your fault if something go wrong during the restoration of your car, if you ask questions, the shop will have a better idea of what you expect, remember questions, not demands, if you get rude with a shop owner, or it’s employees, your car could get pushed to the back burner, so be nice, but make sure that the shop knows what your looking for when the car is done.

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I’ve been in the automotive business for about 20 or 25 years, I have worked in all facets of the industry, from parts to restoration, all different makes and models, I just want to keep people interested in the old cars because it’s where my heart is.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/David_Atkin/19638

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The Smart Girls’ Guide to Buying a Car

If you’re tired of your car wax because it breaks down every so often, then the ceramic paint protection is exactly what you need. Buying a new car, or a car that’s new to you, can be a minefield. Women are traditionally vulnerable to con men when buying cars, taking their cars for a service or anything else related to motoring for that matter. Although we’d like to think that times have changed, and in the most part they have, there are still car sales people waiting for an innocent looking female to trot through the door. This applies to men too, so don’t be offended! At CoverGirl Car Insurance we want you to get the best deal, cheap insurance and above all a great car. So, we’ve compiled a concise guide to what can be one of the most expensive purchases you’ll have to make.

The first thing you will need to do is decide whether you want a new or used car. You probably have a make and model in mind already, so it’s best to do as much research into the car as possible. You can look in trade guides and on the internet to get some ideas about the production and engineering of your desired car. If you go to the dealer armed with this information then you will know what to look for and will know about any parts of the car that are particularly expensive to replace. Whilst doing your research you could also look out for any common problems with your car. For example certain vehicles have notoriously bad electrics and you could be left having to pay a large bill to have them repaired.

So what’s the best bet, new or used?

Buying a new car

Buying a new car gives you the peace of mind that your car hasn’t been rescued from an accident and ‘cut and shut’ (more about this later). Plus you don’t have to worry about service history and recurring problems.

If you decide to buy a new car then you have three options. You can either buy from dealership, from a broker or by personal import from Europe. There are pros and cons to each option so you should look carefully at each to decide what’s best for you. The benefits and pitfalls of each are as follows:

Dealership: Many dealers offer cheap finance schemes with frequent special offers, you can take the car for a test drive and you also may be able trade in your existing car. This is often a more expensive option so it’s worth looking around.

Broker: It is often cheaper to buy through a broker and relatively easy to organise. You may not be able trade your car in.

Personal imports from Europe: Cheaper in the majority of cases. However this is not the easiest way to buy a car. You’ll have to put in quite a bit of work.

What to check when you collect your car
We advise that you check your new car over before you drive off the forecourt. There are a few key things to check:

o That you’ve got a copy of the dealers pre-delivery inspection form

o Check that all lights, electrics, sound systems, alarms, door locks and windscreen wipers work

o Check for any scratches and check that there is no damage to the interior

o Check you’ve got the spare tyre and any tools that are supposed to come with the car

o Make sure you’ve got the manual and service book

Buying a used car

When you buy a used car there are a few more pitfalls to look out for but you can bag yourself a bargain if you look in the right place. It can also be great fun deciding whether you want a sexy classic like an Alfa Romeo Spider or a bargain run-around like a Ford Ka. Whether you chose to buy from a dealer or from the private market you’ll need see the history of the car. This is really important. You can either buy from a franchised dealer, a used car dealer or privately. Here are some of the pros of buying from each:

Franchised dealer: One of the safest places to buy a car. You’ll get a great choice from a franchise. You can get used or nearly new cars. A franchised dealership also might know the entire history of the car. They will also provide you with a warranty, so if anything goes wrong you can take it back and they will fix it.

Used car dealer: They will usually have checked that there is no bad history or outstanding finance. Most dealers have an excellent reputation but you should exercise some caution and again, do your own research about the type of car you’ve chosen. You will usually get at least a 3 month warranty from a used car dealer. But check to see what it covers. Service items like tyres, exhausts and brake pads are not usually covered.

Private purchase: Best place for an excellent bargain. This is the riskiest way to buy a car as the car could have been involved in an accident, and might not belong to the seller. You should ask to meet at the sellers’ home or work and ask the following questions:

1. Is it your car?

2. Has the car ever been in an accident?

3. Can I have a signed receipt?

‘Cut and shut’, counterfeit parts, car ringing and clocking

Unfortunately there are many unscrupulous people out there wanting to make a buck out of the innocent car buyer. Some of the tactics undertaken by an unethical minority leave drivers with dangerous, illegal and unreliable cars. Many cars are stolen and sold on or taken from accidents and patched up to look like new. The following are some ploys that con men use to cheat the buyer:

‘Cut and Shut’

This is when two cars are taken from a scrap yard after write off accidents and welded together. This is extremely dangerous and potentially difficult to spot. Look for mismatched panels, traces of paint on window seals and door handles, mismatched upholstery and signs of serious repair work. It is very difficult to spot a cut and shut but it’s worth a closer inspection in case the person who carried out the work has cut corners.

Counterfeit parts

These are fraudulent copies of genuine manufacturer branded components. They are intended to deceive motorists and can be incredibly realistic. They are however not intended to be safe. Their makers don’t care about the potential safety threat to future drivers. They have started to make fake brake pads, discs and steering linkages. All of these could cause fatal accidents if they go wrong. You probably won’t have the opportunity to check parts before they are fitted to your new car, but it is something you should be aware of when buying a second hand vehicle.

‘Car ringing’

This is where a stolen car has its identification number changed. The vehicle identification number is taken from vehicles that have been written off in an accident. By forging these details thieves can pass off stolen cars as the genuine article to innocent car buyers. Once you’ve paid for a ‘ringer’, it’s too late. It does not belong to you and if it is traced it will be returned to the original owner, so you will lose out considerably. You can look out for this by checking all documents to see if they look forged. If there is little or no paperwork you should also be suspicious.

‘Car clocking’

This is when the car’s odometer is reduced to make it look as if the car has not done as many miles as it has. This makes cars look more valuable than they are. If the mileage of a car looks suspiciously low you should look for other tell tale signs such as wear and tear to the pedal rubbers and seats.

All of the above are seriously detrimental to the buyer and will leave you with a stolen, dangerous or faulty vehicle. If you have any doubts it is advisable to get an independent vehicle inspector to check the car before you buy it. This will avoid any potential fraud and will eliminate the risk to you.

Good luck!

Buying a car should be fun. You could end up with the car of your dreams – if you follow our guide. It really is worth checking for any discrepancies before you make the purchase. There are many ways to check the history and safety of the car so it’s easy to do and worth it in the long term.

Once you’ve bought your car you’ll need to insure it. Visit CoverGirl Car Insurance http://www.covergirlcarinsurance.co.uk 0800 195 48 52 to get car insurance exclusively for women.

Editorial notes: CoverGirl provide cheap car insurance for women. Great value quotes are available online at http://www.covergirlcarinsurance.co.uk

By Sophie Evans

CoverGirl Car Insurance [http://www.covergirlcarinsurance.co.uk]

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Sophie_Evans/8454

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5 Tips to Keep Your Car Looking Great

Some people made a wise decision in choosing car paint protection Adelaide, others are afraid of the risk will regret it. Having a car is convenient, but it takes a lot of responsibility to be a good owner. As with all material things, a car deteriorates over time. But if you know the proper way of taking care of it, you beloved vehicle will stay pretty and reliable much longer than an average car does. It takes some sacrifice, and a great deal of patience, but then you decide it’s time for a replacement, you will find that all your sacrifice will pay off when you try to resell it. So how do you keep your car looking great? Here are 5 tips.

Avoid scratches as much as possible. Are you the type who mindlessly drives against those bushes along your driveway? Then you should be reading this. Scratches are the biggest enemy to your car’s finish. Avoiding scratches is the best way to keep your car finish looking great. Although your paint is made to last some minor torture, that dirt and grime on the car’s surface needs to be rinsed off first with running water before you ever start washing it. Why because some of that dirt can be abrasive, and when rubbed against the surface, it may cause deep scratches. Anything that comes in contact with your car’s finish should be soft – like fresh clean water, wash mitt and chamois.

Protect your car against the elements. Where do you keep your car parked? To maintain its beauty, try to keep it parked in a garage or covered area. If you do not have a garage, then the use of a car cover is recommended. Exposing your car to direct sunlight all the time will cause significant fading of its paint. Sometimes, due to extreme changes in weather (extreme heat to rain to near-freezing temperatures) can make your car paint fade in severe cases the clear coat can fail and peel – and that’s the end of your beautiful car finish. One more thing you must remember – never park your car under a tree, where tree sap can drip on the surface, or under power lines where birds love to perch on. Tree sap and bird droppings, plus petrified bugs on the windshield can do much damage to the car’s paint and glass. Anything that was once organic will oxidize and leave a lasting mark on your car finish – so take it off asap, and don’t let it marinate on your car.

Always maintain a good coat of wax or paint sealant. Keeping a coat of wax on your car will prevent minor scratches, plus it also protects the car against the elements. Even if bird does their thing on top of your car, the paint is less likely to incur damage, since there is a coat of protection to prevent the preventable. Even too much sunlight will not affect a waxed as much as a non-waxed one. Think of it as some sort of sunscreen for your car. Wax your car every three to six months depending on the was/sealant (too much waxing is not recommended also) Cars that are parked under direct sunlight need to be waxed more often to maintain the shine and sheen of the car.

Keep the interior clean – always. Nothing is more pretentious than a car that is so shiny and clean outside, but extremely dirty inside! It’s like a woman who is so physically pretty but ugly deep inside. A car’s interior is just as important as a car’s exterior where appearance is concerned. Fabric covered car seats and car mats can be cleaned with an interior brush to remove dirt particles, then vacuumed. Vinyl or leather seats may be cleaned with a mild commercial detergent or leather cleanser. Clean the interior windows with a commercial glass cleanser. Keep the dashboard spic and span too by vacuuming the nooks and crannies, as well as wiping it with a mild cleanser. Some people even use leather conditioner for leather-lined dashboards. The dashboard takes the blunt of dirt and dust since it’s one of the most exposed and used parts of the car. Besides, all those crevices do have a tendency to gather plenty of dust and dirt. Keep the seats free from rubbish and food crumbs also, as these greatly diminish the beauty of your car.

Detail your car. By detailing, we mean extremely thorough cleaning, polishing and waxing of an automobile, both inside and out, to produce a show-quality level of detail. Besides improving appearance, detailing helps to preserve resale value of a car.When your car is subject to tough conditions, wash your car every 2 weeks – and this is the minimum. Never use dish washing detergent to wash your car with, as these remove the wax coating you spent hours putting on.. Use a PH Neutral car shampoo. Use clean water to rinse your car with, and then dry with a chamois to avoid smears or streaks. And don’t ignore the tires, because the true mark of a serious car owner is attention to all details. Scrub the tires with a brush, then give it a coat of tire shine to make it really stand out. The tire shine also prevents your tiers from going brown. Keep it looking new!

A clean car will be a sight to behold, so keep it looking shiny, bright and pretty. A beautiful-looking car says much about its owner.

Tim is the Owner of Northern Beaches Car Detailing [http://www.northernbeachescardetailing.com/]

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Tim_Matthews/1172256

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